Daily Archives: October 10, 2017

Mimecast Launches the Market’s Leading Multipurpose Archive Solution

Mimecast Cloud Archive Offers Enhanced Features Including Mobility, Data Recovery & Preservation Needed to Manage Email Today

WATERTOWN, Mass., Oct. 10, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Mimecast Limited (NASDAQ:MIME), a leading email and data security company, today announced the launch of Mimecast Cloud Archive, the leading multipurpose archive solution built for the cloud. Mimecast Cloud Archive delivers an all-in-one cloud service that integrates: a secure data repository, built-in data recovery, storage management, e-discovery and compliance capabilities. Mimecast Cloud Archive enables customers to access their email archive anywhere, anytime, and on any device in record speed. Latest innovations will be featured at the Mimecast Cloud Archive global virtual event on October 11, 2017. Mimecast also revealed new data, revealing organizations’ top challenges with archiving solutions.

Eighty-eight Percent of Organizations Struggle with Existing Archive Solutions: Get New-School About Archiving

Legacy on-premises and first generation cloud email archiving platforms have become obsolete, as the way organizations use email has completely changed since archiving’s inception nearly two decades ago. According to new global data from Mimecast and Vanson Bourne, 88 percent of organizations responded that they have experienced problems with their existing archiving solution. Nearly 60 percent cite administrative complexity as a top challenge, while 48 percent experience a lack of scalability. Another 56 percent are plagued by slow search performance. Mimecast Cloud Archive is designed and optimized for the cloud, offering the scale, performance and advanced features needed to manage email today.

“Most email archiving technology was built when email usage was much different. With email being the top communications channel for business, it’s growing at a rate where these on-premises solutions can’t keep up,” said Peter Bauer, chief executive officer, Mimecast.  “Archive needs to be thought of as a digital memory– with multiple dimensions that secure corporate data, empower employees with anywhere, anytime access to email, and ensure regulatory and compliance obligations are met. With Cloud Archive, we’re able to give customers the confidence and control they need, with the industry’s fastest search speeds, to get more value from their email data today.”

Mimecast Cloud Archive latest innovations enable:

  1. E-Discovery and compliance are made easy by leveraging the fastest search performance in the industry. Robust, intuitive tools simplify administrative and e-discovery searches for IT administrators, compliance teams, and legal professionals.
  2. Data recovery with Sync & Recover offers independent, immutable, always-available archives to hedge against data loss or corruption, giving organizations a means to restore their Outlook content – including email, personal folders, calendar entries and contacts – should misfortune strike.
  3. Business insights found in Case Review App allow for fast, effective search of email and attachment data to serve myriad missions, including compliance reviews, litigation case assessments, and internal policy audits. Additionally, Mimecast’s latest integration with Salesforce.com allows for Cloud Archive access and fast search capabilities within the CRM tool.
  4. Long-term data preservation with the archiving of email and attachment data into perpetuity, with no additional fees or charges for storage or retention duration.

“Archiving is intended to perform two vital functions: preserve data and simplify data management functions like search and e-discovery. However, many archiving platforms use on-premises architecture that isn’t able to cost-effectively handle the growing volume of email communications that is the ‘norm’ for businesses today,” said Andrew Smith, senior research analyst at IDC. Buyers – and the market as a whole – are quickly moving to cloud-based archiving solutions that allow for better scale, performance and value.”

The Need for Anywhere, Anytime Archive Access

Mimecast’s new research also found that fifty percent of organizations noted mobility, faster search speed and end-user accessibility as top priorities. Organizations that give employees access to their own email archives enable them to work anytime, anywhere and increase productivity and streamline collaboration. This access also reduces the burden on IT. Ninety-four percent of organizations reported that if their email archiving solution included mobile apps for employees to access personal archives, they would roll them out, with one-fifth saying they would roll them out “without a doubt.”

Mimecast Cloud Archive includes new capabilities that empower employees with fully integrated email management from anywhere, and enhances security by ensuring full IT control over deployment, content access and revocation using their chosen Enterprise Mobility Management solution. Employees can self-serve for rapid archive search, security controls and always-on email whether using a corporate device or their own, increasing productivity.

Mimecast has partnered with BlackBerry, a leader in Enterprise Mobility Management, to ensure Mimecast Mobile can be deployed securely and with the management, access and content controls required. Support for other leading mobility management platforms will follow.

“We live in an always-connected world, and employees have grown to expect access to their corporate email archives anytime, from anywhere,” said Mark Wilson, SVP and Chief Evangelist, BlackBerry. “While this helps drive productivity and collaboration, organizations need to ensure that corporate data is secured in line with policy no matter the device used or if the employee is on or off the corporate network. We’re excited to help Mimecast give IT and security teams the ultimate control over employee access and authentication, while enabling employees to stay productive.”

Want to learn more? Join the Mimecast Cloud Archive live virtual event taking place in three sessions around the globe on Wednesday, Oct. 11th. Attendees will get to hear from Amanda Crew, actress from the hit HBO series Silicon Valley who will present key challenges in archiving plus insights and perspectives from Mimecast CEO Peter Bauer and Mimecast CTO Neil Murray. Attendees also get access to deep-dive demonstrations of the latest product innovations and live technical chat sessions with experts.

Register for the live virtual event in your region here.

Mimecast Resources

Mimecast Social Media Resources

About Mimecast
Mimecast Limited (NASDAQ:MIME) makes business email and data safer for more than 27,300 customers with millions of employees worldwide. Founded in 2003, the company’s next-generation cloud-based security, archiving and continuity services protect email, and deliver comprehensive email risk management in a single, fully-integrated subscription service.

Press Contacts
Alison Raymond Walsh
Press@Mimecast.com
617-393-7126

Investor Contact
Robert Sanders
Investors@Mimecast.com
617-393-7074

Statements in this press release regarding management’s future expectations, beliefs, intentions, goals, strategies, plans or prospects, including without limitation, the sales and marketing efforts and strategy described herein, and the success of those efforts and strategies, may constitute forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 and other federal securities laws. Mimecast intends all such forward-looking statements to be covered by the safe harbor provisions for forward-looking statements contained in Section 21E of the Exchange Act and the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Such forward-looking statements involve known and unknown risks. As a result of such risks, Mimecast’s actual results may differ materially from any future results, performance or achievements discussed in or implied by the forward-looking statements contained herein. Mimecast is providing the information in this press release as of this date and assumes no obligations to update the information included in this press release or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.

Sakharov Prize Short List Announced, Pakistani Christian On Death Row Misses Cut

BRUSSELS — European lawmakers have chosen the three finalists for this year’s Sakharov Prize for Freedom of Thought.

The European Parliament’s foreign affairs and development committees voted on October 10 to short-list a group of people representing the Venezuelan opposition, Guatemalan human rights defender Aura Lolita Chavez Ixcaquic, and the Swedish-Eritrean prisoner of conscience Dawit Isaak.

They were among six nominees for the European Parliament’s prestigious award, which honors individuals and organizations defending human rights and fundamental freedoms.

The three nominees who failed to make the shortlist are Asia Bibi, a Christian woman sentenced to death in 2010 under Pakistans blasphemy law, Selahattin Demirtas and Figen Yuksekdag, co-chairs of a pro-Kurdish party in Turkey, and Pierre Claver Mbonimpa, a human rights defender from Burundi.

The recipient of the award will be announced on October 26 with a ceremony to take place at the parliament in Strasbourg in December.

Copyright (c) 2015. RFE/RL, Inc. Reprinted with the permission of Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, 1201 Connecticut Ave NW, Ste 400, Washington DC 20036.

Pakistan’s Persecuted Minority in Line of Fire

ISLAMABAD, PAKISTAN The son-in-law of Pakistan’s recently ousted prime minister lambasted a minority that human rights groups consider one of the most persecuted in the country.

Mohammed Safdar said members of the Ahmadiyya sect are a “danger to this country, this nation, its constitution and its identity.”

Speaking in the national assembly, of which he is a member, Safdar demanded that Ahmadiyyas, along with the minority Bohra community, be barred from joining the armed forces of the country because their “false religions do not include the concept of jihad in the name of God.”

Safdar is the son-in-law of Nawaz Sharif, who was forced to resign from premiership in July after a court ruled against him in a corruption case. Sharif alleged that the ruling was a conspiracy to remove him from power by the establishment, a euphemism for the country’s powerful military.

A member of Sharif’s ruling Pakistan Muslim League party, Safdar is married to his daughter Maryam Nawaz, who has been widely reported in the news as his potential successor.

In his statement Tuesday, Safdar also demanded that the name of the physics department of the Quaid e Azam University in Islamabad be changed. The department is named after Dr. Abdul Salam, an Ahmadiyya who is also one of Pakistan’s two Nobel laureates. The other one is Malala Yousufzai, who became the youngest person to win a Nobel Peace Prize for her activism in favor of girls’ education.

“If the name of the department is not changed, I would protest here every day,” Safdar said.

His outburst in the assembly followed days of uproar by the opposition parties over a minor amendment in the election law that was deemed to be pro-Ahmadiyya. The government declared it a clerical error and reinstated the original draft of the law.

Ahmadiyyas in Pakistan face a peculiar dilemma. They insist they are Muslims, but the country’s constitution declares them non-Muslims. Officials say Ahmadiyyas are welcome to all the rights afforded to other minorities in the country as long as they do not call themselves followers of the Islamic faith. Ahmadiyyas, on the other hand, insist that doing so would go against their religious beliefs.

Source: Voice of America

CM SINDH ANNOUNCES UNIVERSITY STATUS FOR GOVERNMENT COLLEGE HYDERABAD

Sindh Chief Minister Syed Murad Ali Shah has announced university status for the Government College Hyderabad.

Adressing a function in connection with week-long centenarian celebrations of the Hyderabad College on Tuesday, Syed Murad Ali Shah said the college produced thousands of educated people who are serving in every field of life.

He said the college is our national heritage and vowed to develop it on modern lines.

The chief minister also announced forty million rupees for the college and its library.

Later talking to media, Syed Murad Ali Shah said the Sindh government is spending forty million rupees on construction of roads in the province.

Source: Radio Pakistan

Pakistan’s Sharif Awaits Possible Indictment, Not a First for Country’s Rulers

Few jobs on Earth are less secure than that of Pakistani prime ministers.

The seven decades since the country’s creation have seen a revolving door at the top, with military coups, court-ordered evictions and at least one execution.

Nawaz Sharif knows it all too well. He has held and lost the job three times, benefiting and suffering from the instability that must feel like a bad case of deja vu.

Is he corrupt, as cases against him have claimed? Maybe. But his history of antagonizing the country’s army chiefs, particularly in trying to develop better relations with rival and fellow nuclear power India, is indisputable. In addition, his second term ended after he named Gen. Pervez Musharraf as army chief, changed his mind and tried to forcibly retire the general, who then staged a successful coup.

This time, because of international and domestic circumstances, the military seems to be pulling strings from behind with the assistance of the judiciary, with which Sharif also has clashed repeatedly.

Barred from office

In July, the Supreme Court barred him from office for 10 years for serving as prime minister while also getting a hefty salary in the United Arab Emirates. Expected to be indicted Monday on corruption charges, Sharif flew to London, saying he needed to attend to his ailing wife. Arrest warrants have been issued for his two sons, daughter and a son-in-law over the family’s offshore holdings.

Without naming the military directly, Sharif told a recent news conference that he knew why and who conspired to oust him. Democratically elected prime ministers have always been punished in Pakistan, he said, alluding to the history of military takeovers.

A time has come that we proposed a cure for the 70-year-old cancer, Sharif said.

Sharif’s political archrival Imran Khan, the former cricket star, also faces a litany of court cases over alleged corruption and assets that he allegedly failed to declare to Pakistan’s election authorities as required by law.

History of instability

After a prolonged period of instability and inability of the ruling Pakistan Muslim League to govern, President Sikandar Mirza imposed martial law Oct. 7, 1956. Gen. Ayub Khan, the army chief and defense minister, deposed him 20 days later, put him on a plane to London, assumed absolute power and ruled for 12 years.

Khan’s coup and martial law were unconstitutional but were permitted by the courts, which established the famous doctrine of necessity, a term that signifies extralegal actions undertaken by the significant state actors in order to restore law and order in the country.

After the 1965 war with India ended in a stalemate, Khan’s foreign minister, Zulfiqar Ali Bhutto, resigned over a disagreement, went to the streets and rallied people, forcing Khan to resign in 1969, handing power to his army chief, Gen. Yahya Khan. His two-year rule was extremely turbulent, resulting in the country’s eastern wing breaking away as Bangladesh. Embarrassed, Yahya Khan stepped down and was replaced by his foreign minister, Zulfiqar Ali Bhutto, as the civilian leader.

Bhutto then was ousted in 1977 by the country’s top general, Zia ul-Haq, and hung after being convicted of murdering a high-profile politician, a case that some saw as a personal vendetta. Zia took over, declared martial law and ruled for 11 years.

After Zia died in an unexplained air crash, civilian elections returned to the country.

Bhutto’s 35-year-old daughter, Benazir, won, only to see her government dismissed on corruption charges by President Ghulam Ishaq Khan with strong speculation that the army had a role in the move.

Fresh elections were called that Sharif won, but the president dismissed him in 1993 on allegations of corruption and unleashing a reign of terror against political foes that might have included the poisoning of an army general.

Bhutto returned to power in 1993 before being dismissed three years later on corruption charges, allowing Sharif to return to power a second time. With Bhutto going into exile, activists of his Pakistan Muslim League waged an attack on the Supreme Court, damaging furniture and manhandling judges. Pakistan carried out its first six nuclear tests also during his rule.

Sharif named Musharraf as his army chief, changed his mind and tried to retire Musharraf while he was flying home, only to have the general depose him instead and take over. Sharif was exiled to Saudi Arabia.

Both Bhutto and Sharif were allowed to return in 2007. She was killed by a suicide bomber during a political rally later that year; shortly before her death, she had written to a number of friends abroad expressing concerns over her safety.

In a sympathy vote, her widower, Asif Ali Zardari, was elected president. But in 2008-13, two prime ministers, Yousuf Reza Gilani and Raja Parvez Ashraf, were ousted on contempt-of-court charges by the country’s superior court.

Sharif started his third term in 2013.

Source: Voice of America

Pakistan’s Persecuted Minority in Line of Fire

ISLAMABAD, PAKISTAN The son-in-law of Pakistan’s recently ousted prime minister lambasted a minority that human rights groups consider one of the most persecuted in the country.

Mohammed Safdar said members of the Ahmadiyya sect are a “danger to this country, this nation, its constitution and its identity.”

Speaking in the national assembly, of which he is a member, Safdar demanded that Ahmadiyyas, along with the minority Bohra community, be barred from joining the armed forces of the country because their “false religions do not include the concept of jihad in the name of God.”

Safdar is the son-in-law of Nawaz Sharif, who was forced to resign from premiership in July after a court ruled against him in a corruption case. Sharif alleged that the ruling was a conspiracy to remove him from power by the establishment, a euphemism for the country’s powerful military.

A member of Sharif’s ruling Pakistan Muslim League party, Safdar is married to his daughter Maryam Nawaz, who has been widely reported in the news as his potential successor.

In his statement Tuesday, Safdar also demanded that the name of the physics department of the Quaid e Azam University in Islamabad be changed. The department is named after Dr. Abdul Salam, an Ahmadiyya who is also one of Pakistan’s two Nobel laureates. The other one is Malala Yousufzai, who became the youngest person to win a Nobel Peace Prize for her activism in favor of girls’ education.

“If the name of the department is not changed, I would protest here every day,” Safdar said.

His outburst in the assembly followed days of uproar by the opposition parties over a minor amendment in the election law that was deemed to be pro-Ahmadiyya. The government declared it a clerical error and reinstated the original draft of the law.

Ahmadiyyas in Pakistan face a peculiar dilemma. They insist they are Muslims, but the country’s constitution declares them non-Muslims. Officials say Ahmadiyyas are welcome to all the rights afforded to other minorities in the country as long as they do not call themselves followers of the Islamic faith. Ahmadiyyas, on the other hand, insist that doing so would go against their religious beliefs.

Source: Voice of America